top of page

CCR Projects

Stuart

Project Description

The former coal-fired power plant is located near Aberdeen, Ohio. KEY provided engineering support to work through plant demolition and closure of the coal combustion residuals (CCR) units. The client received Ohio EPA approval for closure by removal of the CCR ponds and closure in place of two CCR landfills. KEY proceeded with closure design under the Federal CCR Rule, while concurrently satisfying the Ohio EPA requirements.

Activities Performed

The project scope of work included:

  • Construction engineering support;

  • Borrow materials evaluations, preparation of closure plans and Permit to Install PTI applications;

  • Consolidation of groundwater unit monitoring;

  • Permitting support;

  • Material management evaluations and technical support;

  • Coordination with the Ohio EPA and the Ohio DNR;

  • Optimization of the closure designs; and,

  • CCR landfill grading designs and final closure permitting.

  • PTI applications submitted and approved by the Ohio EPA for two former CCR ponds, the coal storage yard, and gypsum storage facility covering a total area of approximately 120 acres;

  • Ohio DNR approval to eliminate the dam permits for three former Class I (high-hazard) dams associated with the former CCR ponds, resulting in approximately 1 mile of berms removed from inspection and reporting requirements;

  • Modification and reduction of the groundwater monitoring programs resulting in approximately $50k in annual cost reduction;

  • Ohio EPA approval for a revised Closure Plan and elimination of a Class II residual waste permitted landfill facility; and,

  • PTI applications submitted to and approved by the Ohio EPA for three former CCR ponds covering a total area of approximately 80 acres.

  • PTI applications submitted and approved by the Ohio EPA for two-CCR landfills covering a total area of approximately 355 acres.  Due to KEY’s up-front investigation and subsequent negotiations with the Ohio EPA, the expected closure costs were reduced by several million dollars.

bottom of page